School Programs

classroom-acousticsThere are a few groups out there developing information for schools on noise-induced hearing loss and its prevention. See below for some great resources.

Care for Kids’ Ears

The Australian Government’s Department for Health has released care for kids ears, with a focus on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. There are some nice multimedia resources as well as an area dedicated to teachers.

Cheers for Ears

The Ear Science Institute Australia has developed Cheers for Ears, a noise-induced hearing loss prevention program targeted at upper primary school students (10 to 12 year olds). There’s even a new game, Epic Ear Defence, to teach young children the dangers of prolonged exposure to loud noise.

Dangerous Decibels

Based in Colorado in the USA, Dangerous Decibels is an innovative collaboration between basic science researchers, clinicians, museum educators, health communication experts, civic leaders, teachers, public health professionals, and volunteers. They have a series of outreach and education resources as well as What’s That Sound? an interactive game that is a great way to show younger kids how hearing loss would affect the way their world sounds.

Hear 2Day

The Grow Smart Foundation developed a noise awareness program targeted at 12 to 13 year old Australians to demonstrate effects of playing personal music players (MP3, mobile phones and iPods) at dangerously high volumes over time. The fun, interactive multimedia program is designed to be delivered through a variety of different way, from school classroom presentations to public community events.

…mid 2017 this could no longer be found on the internet, hopfully it will be back up and running soon!

Hear 4 Tomorrow

Developed through the National Acoustic Laboratories in Australia, an expert team of teachers and hearing researchers came up with and successfully trialed the Hear 4 Tomorrow program for use in Primary Schools. This comprehensive school-based teaching program equips young people with the knowledge and skills they need to look after their hearing, now and forever.

Noisy Planet and WISE EARS

In the USA, the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) have some interesting resources for teachers and students on their own site, as well as campaign based site called Noisy Planet. Noisy planet is more than just a school program and includes information for parents and features a Tween zone.

Back in 1999, the NIDCD teamed up with National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health to create WISE EARS. While there’s little on the actual program anymore, there is still access to their tool kit, which includes fact sheets, brochures, games, posters, and even radio scripts. Many printed materials are available in both English and Spanish, and all are provided in PDF format for reproduction by teachers, physicians, advocacy organisations and anyone else who can help promote hearing and prevent noise-induced hearing loss.